A Wise Person Once Said…

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There once was a campaign in the United States for an investment broker, where the tagline read, “When <company> talks, everyone listens.” You may not have an iota of interest in the stock market, of course, but when the Doctor steps forward, takes a strengthening breath, and begins an oration, the viewing audience joins the supporting cast in rapt attention to what is about to be said. It may even be argued that within the past 3 series, the opportunities for and occurrences of these monologues are steadily increasing — much to our fascination.

This week, Keir and Haley tour a series of the Doctor’s most impactful speeches, from short but sweet consolations to a distraught listener, to the arms-wide, sermon-on-the-mount powerhouses that hold armies at bay, and give would-be gods reason to take heed. We discuss the apparent rise in the breadth and content of these speeches, and the adept way that Doctor Who writers have historically written to the strengths of each actor portraying the titular role.

Some referenced moments for your research:

  • First Doctor to Susan, in “Dalek Invasion of Earth”
  • Second Doctor to Victoria, in “Tomb of the Cybermen”
  • Third Doctor to Jo Grant, in “The Time Monster” (thanks to Ian for the suggestion!)
  • Fourth Doctor to Sarah Jane, in “Genesis of the Daleks”
  • Sixth Doctor to the Valeyard and Inquisitor, in “Trial of a Timelord”
  • Ninth Doctor to Rose, in “Parting of the Ways”
  • Tenth Doctor soliloquy, in “The Waters of Mars”
  • Eleventh Doctor to the assembled armada, in “The Pandorica Opens”
  • Twelfth Doctor to Bonnie, in “The Zygon Inversion”

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Donna, We’re On!

The Tenth Doctor Adventures

We’ve spent numerous conversations both on and off GPR discussing the relationships and balance of persona between the Doctor and any given companion in the past, and undoubtedly will continue to do so in years to come, as storyline and casting changes occur. Within the many permutations we’ve witnessed as Doctor Who fans, there may be none that compares to the TARDIS Team that was at once both the greatest friendship, and the most delightful discord, as the Tenth Doctor and Donna Noble. We still put a clenched hand to our hearts as we reflect on the closure of Donna’s travels with her “Spaceman”, but with thanks to the exceptional writing of Matt Fitton, Jenny Colgan, and James Goss, and the triumphant return of David Tennant and Catherine Tate to the studios of Big Finish, we can turn the clocks back and enjoy more adventures (and misadventures) had during their time together.

David Tennant & Catherine Tate

This week, we take a listener request to review the first series of The Tenth Doctor Adventures from Big Finish. From hyperintelligent alien adversaries, to the weaponization of time, to the living embodiment of death, Tennant and Tate are so adept at their craft that we might never have seen them leave the BBC Wales set. The Doctor and Donna crash headlong into these stories with every ounce of energy we could wish for, and it’s all we can do to hang on for the ride. We discuss the strength of their symbiotic relationship, the writers’ skills at capturing their dynamic as well as pitting them against foes that bring out the best in both, and in the end, our overwhelming desire — nay, need — to continue these stories for many seasons to come.

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Hey, It’s (That Doctor Who Actor)!

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The television shines with that welcome glow, you begin to watch a new program or film for the evening, and all of a sudden, an unexpected familiar face pulls you completely out of the storyline as you realize that you’re looking at one of your beloved Doctor Who characters, but seen completely out of character. (Does that make sense?)

This week, we discuss instances where Doctor Who alum appear out-of-the-blue in shows or films we weren’t prepared for, forcing us to try and reconcile the conflicting thoughts caused when seeing this strange new person, against the Doctor, Companion or other Whovian we truly know them to be.

(Editor’s note: Jay was extremely tired, and misspoke. Honestly, he does know the difference between Kenneth Branagh and Kiefer Sutherland. The spelling and pronunciation of their names, for example…)

Listener Contributions:

  • Deb Stanish, Verity Podcast (via Twitter): “Well, Barrowman in Shark Attack 3: Megalodon is a classic. 😉 But my fave is Eccleston in Revengers Tragedy.(Editor’s other note: we originally quoted this as Shark Attack 2. Clearly, we are highly remiss in not knowing that it was the cinematic genius that is Shark Attack 3 that Deb meant to refer. How dare we?)
  • Esther (via email): “Okay, my two movies for your podcast is Paul McGann in The Importance of Being Earnest (had to watch it for school) and Billie Piper in Mansfield Park.
  • Mike Solko, Time Scoop Podcast (via Twitter): “Tennant is fun in The Decoy Bride. Not sure if Eccleston in Cracker qualifies. Definitely aforementioned Revengers Tragedy.”

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Our Favorites: Silence in the Library/Forest of the Dead

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A planet-sized library. 4,022 missing people. Hive-minded swarms of shadow piranhas. A team of futuristic archeologists in peril. And among them, one enigmatic professor with a greater knowledge of events than she reasonably should. Need we say more?

It doesn’t take a genius to see why Haley made these episodes her choice for the GPR “Our Favorites” arc. The iconic introduction of River, Donna in full force, the Tenth Doctor’s hair, and of course, the bone-scattering Vashta Nerada. This two-part whirlwind from Steven Moffat is structurally solid, fan-rewarding, and a genuinely thrilling story. Join us as we revisit the Library, toss a few ‘spoilers’ to the wind, and simultaneously say a “Hello, Sweetie” and a fond farewell to River Song.

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Our Favorites: The Girl in the Fireplace

GPR Post HeaderWhat happens when you combine David Tennant’s full-tilt portrayal of the boyish, madcap Doctor, Steven Moffat’s ability to create emotionally compelling tales, pre-revolutionary France, organ-harvesting clockwork droids from 3,000 years in the future, and the incredibly lovely Sofia Myles? Clearly, you result in one of the first “modern classic” episodes of post-2005 Doctor Who.

This week, our appreciation of personal favorite stories allows Jay to share his episode selection, “The Girl in the Fireplace”. As a great stand-alone episode, and a perfect sample of what the show is capable of portraying for appreciators of science fiction, drama, comedy and even romance, it’s easy to see why this ranks so highly on his list of “essential” episodes, and additionally, his “starter set” of stories to introduce new viewers of the program.

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